Tag Archives: Intentional nonadherence

Intentional nonadherence describes the situation where patients actively chooses not to take a medication as prescribed by a physician. As an example, this may be based on a decision process that weighs their beliefs about benefits of treatment against their beliefs about the severity of potential side effects.

HCP Solutions to Poor Adherence: Should Logic or Emotion Be the Focus?

When HCPs address issues of poor adherence with their patients, where should their focus lie? Should it be more on logic or on emotion? Here are a few thoughts about why emotion should be front-of-mind. Two recent publications got me thinking again about the roles of emotion and logic in adherence-related decisions. This time from the HCP perspective. HCPs Show Poor Adherence to Treatment Guidelines A report from the Dartmouth… Read More »

Patients’ Adherence Decision-Making: The Roles of Emotion and Logic

For patients, adherence decision-making is based on a mix of emotion and logic. Understanding where an individual patient’s balance point lies and responding appropriately could be a major key to better adherence. Roles of Emotion and Logic in Decision-Making If asked whether your decision-making processes leaned more on logic or emotion; what would you say? I’d guess most of us believe our decisions emerge from a rational and logical consideration… Read More »

Addressing Adherence: The Need to Prioritize

Is enough rigor put into identifying the causes of non-adherence? Or into prioritizing these causes? Addressing adherence issues in the right order could have a major impact on improving adherence. Adherence and Diagnostic Rigor HCPs make clinical diagnoses based on a defined, rational process. Typically the process involves an examination of different inputs, such as patient history, physical signs, symptoms, and diagnostic test results. These findings are matched against possible… Read More »

5 Reasons Why Patient Motivation Is Vital for Adherence

It’s widely accepted that patient motivation is a factor in non-adherence. But just how much of a factor is it? And how does it rank vs other factors? Here are some thoughts on why patient motivation is of primary importance to improving adherence. Improving Adherence Behaviors Isn’t Easy I’d guess we’re all familiar with the old joke about psychiatrists and light bulbs. It goes something like this: Q. How many psychiatrists… Read More »

Simplify Adherence by Identifying Patient Intentions

Progress to improve adherence has been frustratingly slow. Maybe there are just too many options and too much information; making understanding and interpretation difficult? We need to simplify adherence in order to make the breakthroughs needed. Identifying patient intentions can help achieve this. Too Many Pieces in the Adherence Puzzle? Improvements in adherence have been difficult to achieve and progress has been frustratingly slow. To what extent is this lack… Read More »

Adherence Approaches: What If We Have the Wrong Focus?

Some adherence approaches aim to motivate patients by imposing opinions. Other approaches draw out motivations from within the patient. So which should be the more important focus? Recipe for Improved Adherence Approaches? A JAMA editorial appeared last week with the title of: “Ingredients of Successful Interventions to Improve Medication Adherence”.  The article suggested that well-designed interventions should be based on four essential approaches – patient knowledge, counseling and accountability, self-monitoring,… Read More »

Changing Patient Beliefs is Key to Better Adherence

To promote better adherence, should greater emphasis be placed on changing patients’ beliefs? This post explores why changing beliefs may be a key component in interventions to improve medication adherence. Health Psychology as a Route to Better Adherence A news release on adherence and patient beliefs recently caught my eye. It came from Atlantis Healthcare, a company that uses health psychology to encourage better adherence. The rationale for this approach… Read More »